Wildflower Stratification

Posted by kristen campbell on

Wildflower stratification

          Wildflower seeds require some special treatment before planting. The most important treatment techniques involve stratification and scarification processes.[1] Stratification improves germination in most native grasses and wildflowers. Stratification involves exposing seeds to a cold and damp period before sowing. Most native flowers do this naturally by seeding out in late summer or autumn. Their seeds lie damp and cold on the soil surface for at least one winter season before germinating. Stratification mimics this process.  Natural inhibitors are leached out of the seeds during stratification. Stratification technique can be done as follow; Place seeds in a clean bag or container with a little moisture, enough to make them damp, but not soggy. Place them in the fridge for one to three weeks, then plant immediately.  Scarification is known as the intentional removal or damaging of the seed coat. Scarification should not be applied until the seeds are about to be planted. Naturally, rain action and soil microbes carry out natural scarification. Also, it may be accomplished by the seeds passing through the digestive system of an animal. [2]  Scarification technique can be done as follow; hard coated wildflower seeds can be encouraged to germinate more readily by rubbing between two sheets of sandpaper hence allowing moisture to penetrate more readily. [1]

Radical Roots initiates stratification in late Winter so our Spring seed bombs are ready to be planted. Though as native wildflower progress some species will grow, either roots and/or seedlings but may not flower until the following year. Wildflower create their own continual growth stages that last decades. 

 

REFERENCES

 

1. Northcott, J. Wildflower seed stratification and scarification 2015  [cited 2015 12th August]; Available from http://www.wildflowersuk.com/blog/wildflower-seed-stratification-and-scarification/.

2. wildflowers. Seed Treatments. 2020  [cited 2020 April 30th ]; Available from: http://www.wildflowers.ie/wild-zone/technical-wild-flower/seed_treatments.htm.

 


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